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Resources Database

Example: A search for contin would match titles containing continuum, discontinue, continuation, etc.

1042 resources listed:

The Surprisingly Weak Evidence Base for Supervision: Findings from a systematic review of research in child welfare practice (2000–2012)

The objective of this study is to ascertain what is known about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of supervision in child welfare in relation to outcomes for consumers/service users, staff and organizations. The evidence base for the effectiveness of supervision in child welfare is surprisingly weak. An agenda for research based on a framework for the development and evaluation of complex interventions is proposed.

Author(s): 
JohnCarpenter, Caroline M.Webb, Lisa Bostock
Year of Publication: 
2013

Factors Influencing Retention of Child Welfare Staff: A systematic review of research

Child welfare agencies need to identify and implement effective strategies to recruit and retain well-qualified staff that has the knowledge, skills and commitment to provide services to our nation’s most vulnerable children and families.

Author(s): 
Institute for the Advancement of Social Work Research
Year of Publication: 
2005

Models of Workforce Development

This paper provides a selection of models and approaches to workforce development that are of relevance to NSW non-government community sector (the sector). The intention is to provide a brief summary of existing options to assist us in developing a preferred model for the development of a workforce development strategy for our sector. 

In this respect this paper aims to provide a descriptive summary (rather than an analysis) of current models, as well as stimulate thinking and discussion.  

Author(s): 
NSW Council of Social Service
Year of Publication: 
2007

From Supervision to Organisational Learning: A typology to integrate supervision, mentorship, consultation and coaching

Supervision is recognised as one of the major determinants of the quality of service to social work clients, the advancement of professional development and social workers’ level of job satisfaction. However, educational and supportive roles of supervisors have been constrained by administrative obligations. It is envisaged that the future path of supervision will be a new form of organisational learning. This paper aims to integrate supervision with three other kinds of organisational learning: mentorship, consultation and coaching.

Author(s): 
Ming-sum Tsui, Kieran O’Donoghue, Jennifer Boddy, Chui-man Pak
Year of Publication: 
2017

Supervision, Support and Mentoring Interventions For Health Practitioners in Rural and Remote Contexts: An integrative review and thematic synthesis of the literature to identify mechanisms for successful outcomes

This review includes 43 papers that evaluated support strategies for the rural and remote health workforce. Interventions were predominantly training and education programmes with limited evaluations of supervision and mentoring interventions.

Author(s): 
Anna M Moran, Julia Coyle, Rod Pope, Dianne Boxall, Susan A Nancarrow and Jennifer Young
Year of Publication: 
2014

Sustaining Tensions in Practice Supervision

This qualitative research assesses the impact of a new supervision policy at Wigan Social Services Department over the first year of phased implementation. Results of 40 staff interviews suggest that the major difficulties centered on the relationship between managerial and professional agendas and the nature of both vertical and horizontal communication within the organisation. With hindsight it is thought that some of the initial tensions were partly responses to the process of change itself.

Author(s): 
Froggett L
Year of Publication: 
1998

Changing the Focus of Social Work Supervision: Effects on client satisfaction and generalised contentment

This study examines the efficacy of client-centred supervision for improving client satisfaction in a community mental health team. Using supervision to ask questions about client problems and staff interventions in the context of client outcomes appears to increase staff use of basic communication, problem-solving and relationship skills in clinical practice and to improve client outcomes.

Author(s): 
Harkness D & Hensley H
Year of Publication: 
1991

Fostering Local Partnerships in Remote Management and High-threat Settings: Emerging lessons from child protection programming in Syria

This study documents lessons from child protection activities focusing on psychosocial interventions in southern and central Syria. Partnerships with local actors are at the core of remote management arrangements, and are the only viable option to deliver child protection interventions in many parts of Syria.

Author(s): 
Sara Pavanello with Larissa Fast and Eva Svoboda
Year of Publication: 
2018

Enhanced Supervision Approaches: Landscape Analysis

Defined as “a broad set of supervisory interventions that improve provider performance through team-based learning approaches, including supportive supervision, the use of checklists, and in-person visits,” enhanced supervision is estimated to have the highest potential impact of all health systems interventions (USAID, 2017). But which strategies are most effective? Can strategies be adapted for different settings; monitored; improved?

Author(s): 
HRH2030
Year of Publication: 
2018

MESH-QI Implementation Guide: Mentorship and Enhanced Supervision for Healthcare and Quality Improvement

This guideline describes how to implement Mentorship and Enhanced Supervision for Health Care and Quality Improvement, or MESH-QI, programs to improve quality of care, data collection, on-site education and clinical mentoring, as a model for Health Systems Strengthening. With a focus on the health workforce, this guide offers lessons that are applicable for the social service workforce and allied workforces.

Author(s): 
Anatole Manzi, Catherine Kirk, Lisa R. Hirschhorn, Partners in Health
Year of Publication: 
2017

Strengthening Supportive Supervision at the District Health Level in the Pacific

This health workforce management policy brief highlights the importance of supervision for health worker performance and achieving health development goals; however, the brief also notes that supportive supervision within health systems in the Pacific is rated poorly. The brief reviews the challenges to overcome and makes recommendations to governments for improved supportive supervision.

Author(s): 
Augustine Asante and Graham Roberts
Year of Publication: 
2011

Support Supervision Guide for Orphans and Other Vulnerable Children Service Delivery

This guide aims to facilitate provision of technical support and quality assurance for OVC services and interventions in a comprehensive manner by different stakeholders. It is expected that the national ministry will use this tool to supervise Technical Services Originations (TSOs), local governments and stakeholders. The higher local government, particularly the Community Based Service Departments (CBSDs), will use this tool to provide support supervision to lower local government and the community level OVC service providers.

Author(s): 
Ministry of Gender Labour and Social Development Uganda
Year of Publication: 
2009

Training for Mid-Level Managers: Supportive supervision

This module is aimed at mid-level managers in the context of vaccine services, but provides valuable lessons on establishing supportive supervision systems, planning of visits and follow up activities after visits. Included is a sample supervisory checklist.

Author(s): 
World Health Organization, Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals
Year of Publication: 
2008

Standards for Employers of Social Workers in England and Supervision Framework

These standards and the framework set out the shared core expectations of employers which will enable social workers in all employment settings to work effectively. The Standards and Framework build upon existing tools and are intended to inform the revised inspection frameworks that will be aligned to this developing approach to public service regulation.

Author(s): 
Social Work Reform Board
Year of Publication: 
2013

Building a Model and Framework for Child Welfare Supervision

Tasked with examining the responsibilities and needs of supervisory staff to develop an organizational framework to support effective child welfare supervision, authors developed this resource as a roadmap for agency leaders as they think through ways to build and sustain effective child welfare supervision in their agencies.

Author(s): 
Peg Hess, PhD; Susan Kanak, Julie Atkins, Children's Bureau
Year of Publication: 
2009

Pages

The query yielded 1042 items